Fire Dragon festival in Macau, Hong Kong. Photo by Chi Hung Cheung.

Fire Dragon festival in Macau, Hong Kong. Photo by Chi Hung Cheung.

Staged photo by Dutch photographer Cor Jaring in support of the Provo movement of 1960’s Amsterdam.

Staged photo by Dutch photographer Cor Jaring in support of the Provo movement of 1960’s Amsterdam.

Forest Chapel, Bohmian Forest, Czech Republic from photographer Kilian Schoenberger’s series entitled Brothers Grimm.

Forest Chapel, Bohmian Forest, Czech Republic from photographer Kilian Schoenberger’s series entitled Brothers Grimm.

A “Living Bridge" in Meghalaya, India. These bridges are created by coaxing a network of roots and branches across the river bank. The bridges take generations to complete.

A “Living Bridge" in Meghalaya, India. These bridges are created by coaxing a network of roots and branches across the river bank. The bridges take generations to complete.

Big Drop Romance by Isaac Gautschi.

Big Drop Romance by Isaac Gautschi.

Tram 58 terminus in Zugliget, Budapest, Hungary circa 1970’s.

Tram 58 terminus in Zugliget, Budapest, Hungary circa 1970’s.

The Universe Is In Us a photo collage by Tahar Abroudjameur, from the NASA Remix Project.

The Universe Is In Us a photo collage by Tahar Abroudjameur, from the NASA Remix Project.

Abandoned railroad tracks on Taipingshan Mountain, Taiwan. Photo by Justin Jones.

Abandoned railroad tracks on Taipingshan Mountain, Taiwan. Photo by Justin Jones.

A composite image titled Traffic Lights by Lucas Zimmermann.

A composite image titled Traffic Lights by Lucas Zimmermann.

R.S. Connett painting titled Capilulation.
From the artist:

I believe that in the not too distant future we will accelerate the augmentation of our bodies using technology to an unprecedented degree. What began with wooden legs, hearing aids and eye glasses will become biomechanical “super-limbs”, super-vison eye implants and computer brain inseminations. I foresee surgically implanted communication devises, (Hey! I’d get one, wouldn’t you?) and … Well, only your imagination is the limit, and we all know there is no limit to the human imagination. I am one who believes that if we don’t kill ourselves in the next few decades, we will begin to push beyond Darwinian evolution. We will begin to “self-evolve” and “self-invent”. I foresee the next revolution of mankind being that of reinventing ourselves in the literal sense. We will become something all together new! I may be to old to see the day that death is “cured”, but some of you reading this now might actually live to see this.
Eventually all human beings will need to capitulate to the inevitability of our self re-design or parish. Evolution is evolution after all. :)

R.S. Connett painting titled Capilulation.

From the artist:

I believe that in the not too distant future we will accelerate the augmentation of our bodies using technology to an unprecedented degree. What began with wooden legs, hearing aids and eye glasses will become biomechanical “super-limbs”, super-vison eye implants and computer brain inseminations. I foresee surgically implanted communication devises, (Hey! I’d get one, wouldn’t you?) and … Well, only your imagination is the limit, and we all know there is no limit to the human imagination. I am one who believes that if we don’t kill ourselves in the next few decades, we will begin to push beyond Darwinian evolution. We will begin to “self-evolve” and “self-invent”. I foresee the next revolution of mankind being that of reinventing ourselves in the literal sense. We will become something all together new! I may be to old to see the day that death is “cured”, but some of you reading this now might actually live to see this.

Eventually all human beings will need to capitulate to the inevitability of our self re-design or parish. Evolution is evolution after all. :)

1210 Turntable Music from Mads Peitersen Anatomy series.

1210 Turntable Music from Mads Peitersen Anatomy series.

Lost in Time: An Ancient Forest. Avenue du Baobab, Morandava, Madagascar. Photo and caption by Ken Thorne.

Near the city of Morondava, on the West coast of Madagascar lies an ancient forest of Baobab trees. Unique to Madagascar, the endemic species is sacred to the Malagasy people, and rightly so. Walking amongst these giants is like nothing else on this planet. Some of the trees here are over a thousand years old. It is a spiritual place, almost magical.

Lost in Time: An Ancient Forest. Avenue du Baobab, Morandava, Madagascar. Photo and caption by Ken Thorne.

Near the city of Morondava, on the West coast of Madagascar lies an ancient forest of Baobab trees. Unique to Madagascar, the endemic species is sacred to the Malagasy people, and rightly so. Walking amongst these giants is like nothing else on this planet. Some of the trees here are over a thousand years old. It is a spiritual place, almost magical.

The Queen’s Return by Wojtek Fus.

The Queen’s Return by Wojtek Fus.

Portrait of a purported onna-bugeisha found amongst a series of actor and kabuki photographs.

Portrait of a purported onna-bugeisha found amongst a series of actor and kabuki photographs.

Men dressed as babugeri mummers for the pagan inspired annual mummer carnival in Bansko, Bulgaria.
Photo by Charles Freger from his Wilder Mann series.
From Bulgaria Travel:

The custom of “Mummers” (“Kukeri”) in the Bulgarian lands was originated thousands of years ago. It was celebrated by the Thracian tribes when meeting their new year and the beginning of the new planting season associated with tilling the fields. With their rituals the Kukeri dance the winter away and welcome the coming summer fertility. In different parts of Bulgaria the mummers go out at different times - right after the New Year or in March after Shrove (these celebrations correspond to the Western Christian Carnival). Mummers have different names: babugeri, pesyatsi, bear-leaders, elders, Kukove. They dress in leather or with a mixture of male and female clothes and put on scary masks, hang bells and carry swords or sticks to frighten away the frigid and fruitless winter. Then they dance in the streets to scare the evil forces and to banish the cold and perform rituals for fertility and health such as plowing, sowing, and others.

Men dressed as babugeri mummers for the pagan inspired annual mummer carnival in Bansko, Bulgaria.

Photo by Charles Freger from his Wilder Mann series.

From Bulgaria Travel:

The custom of “Mummers” (“Kukeri”) in the Bulgarian lands was originated thousands of years ago. It was celebrated by the Thracian tribes when meeting their new year and the beginning of the new planting season associated with tilling the fields. With their rituals the Kukeri dance the winter away and welcome the coming summer fertility. In different parts of Bulgaria the mummers go out at different times - right after the New Year or in March after Shrove (these celebrations correspond to the Western Christian Carnival). Mummers have different names: babugeri, pesyatsi, bear-leaders, elders, Kukove. They dress in leather or with a mixture of male and female clothes and put on scary masks, hang bells and carry swords or sticks to frighten away the frigid and fruitless winter. Then they dance in the streets to scare the evil forces and to banish the cold and perform rituals for fertility and health such as plowing, sowing, and others.